Sparrowhawk’s Breakfast

I am starting this post with a pretty picture, in the hope that this picture will be the one displayed in the WordPress Reader and my tweet. Once you get past this picture the text and images will take on a more grisly nature.Photo of bee in evening primrose

Back in March I found a pool of blood near the bird table and then noticed the feathers fluttering about on the lawn.  Photo of pigeon blood

Closer inspection revealed the body of a pigeon. The aura of plucked feathers indicated that the bird had been killed by a sparrowhawk. Past experience told me that she would be back in the morning to finish her meal, so I positioned my wildlife camera to capture the event.Photo of feathers on lawn

The poor hen pigeon was in the process of forming an egg when death came mercilessly upon her from above.Photo of dead pigeon

The early bird gets an egg for breakfast. The first visitor was a magpie who snatched the egg from the pigeon’s body and flew off with it.Photo of magpie

Shortly afterwards the sparrowhawk arrived and proceeded to further pluck and eat her meal. When the pigeon had been reduced in weight she flew off with the remains of the carcass to eat somewhere safer.Photo of sparrowhawk

It is a female sparrowhawk that visits our garden. She is larger and browner than the male. Traditionally these birds are woodland hunters; highly manoeuvrable, their tactic is to hide in cover and ambush other birds with a brief chase.Photo of sparrowhawk

Habitat loss, persecution by game keepers and the use of a now banned pesticide saw their numbers crash. Being an apex predator they are susceptible to bioaccumulation, whereby the poisons ingested but not excreted in prey build up; firstly in insects, then the birds that feed on the insects and finally the raptors that feed on those birds. However, they are now recovering and have learnt that our gardens are a useful resource for them.Photo of sparrowhawk

It seems that the larger females are generally more likely to be found in urban gardens where they take down blackbirds and the larger doves and pigeons, while the smaller males are pursuing song birds in woodlands.Photo of sparrowhawk

There are some more facts, literature and historical fancies in my previous post Sparrowhawk here. If you wish to watch a video of the sparrowhawk eating her breakfast you can watch it on You Tube here. The end.Photo of sparrowhawk

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Sparrowhawk’s Breakfast

  1. I had a similar gruesome discovery a couple of weeks ago, but unlike you, I didn’t have the foresight to consider the sparrowhawk’s return! But return he did and all that remained were a few feathers the second time. Well done on great shots! The first picture is indeed lovely!

    • Thank you. I’m not personally squeamish, but I know they are not everyone’s cup of tea, especially at breakfast time, so I thought I had better warn folks. It is all part of the daily struggle for these animals and I find it a privilege to be able to witness it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s