Hawkweed Hoverers

In keeping with our tradition of having more plants blooming on the paths than in the borders, the paving cracks are bursting forth with these cheery yellow hawkweed flowers.photo of cat's ear

Hawkweeds are related to dandelions and are members of the Asteraceae family, genus  hierakion. The name is derived from the Greek word for hawk, hierax, folklore has it that hawks drank the juice of this plant to sharpen their eyesight.  There are many different species of hawkweed and a great deal of variation within them. The only one that I can confidently identify is the orange hawkweed, Pilosella aurantiaca, commonly known as “fox and cubs”. It is a beautiful wildflower that is in the RHS top 400 perfect plants for pollinators.Photo of fox-and-cubs

The delightfully named mouse ear hawkweed was a folk medicine for coughs. The apothecary to James I, John Parkinson, also suggested it as a sedative for horses, ‘Mouseare’ be given to any horse it ‘will cause that he shall not be hurt by the smith that shooeth him.’

On one of the few sunny days that we had this summer I found that the hawkweed was being enjoyed by this little solitary bee. A kind person suggested that it was likely to be of the genus Lasioglossum.Photo of bee on hawkweed

Another hawkweed hoverer was this drone hoverfly, a bee mimic. Photo of hoverfly on hawkweed

As you can see it is doing a fantastic job of collecting and redistributing pollen. Photo of hoverfly on hawkweed

I am not clever enough to tell whether it is Eristalis pertinax or Eristalis tenax. Photo of hoverfly on hawkweed

Tenax has black ankles and pertinax has yellow ankles, so it is all down to the hoverfly’s ankles rather than the bee’s knees.Photo of hoverfly on hawkweedThe goldenrod was another bright yellow flower attracting pollinating insects.

 

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10 thoughts on “Hawkweed Hoverers

  1. I love “fox & cubs”, it’s such a lovely colour. One of the houses along our road sometimes has some popping up in the front lawn and I look at it enviously every time I walk past, but they probably wouldn’t be too pleased if I pinched it!

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